Fight Against Cancer

As students complete their study of life science, seventh graders were privileged to learn about innovative technology in the fight against cancer. Aaron Ross, son of Arma Dei music teacher Mrs. Leah Ross, is a Clinical Researcher in the Oncology Department at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee. He shared with the students how they might pursue a career in medicine. Special thanks to Aaron for taking time to teach our seventh graders.

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Speech Meet

Arma Dei Academy and Augustine Classical Academy joined together for the first Speech Meet in each school's history. Grades 1-7 competed in the memorization and presentation of poetry, Bible, and various other readings. Grade 8 engaged in a lively debate. First Place Winners Click here to view videos 1st Grade Marshall Foley The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 2nd Grade Austin Butler Egypt and Menes by David Manly 4th Grade Nathan Edwards How Did You Die? by Edmund Vance Cooke 5th Grade Jordyn Pranno Drop A Pebble in the Water by James W. Foley 7th Grade Preston…

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The fourth grade presents the periodic table

The fourth grade presented the periodic table in song at Chapel last week, along with a special "volcano" science experiment. The periodic table is a tabular arrangement of the chemical elements, ordered by their atomic number, electron configurations, and recurring chemical properties. This ordering shows periodic trends, such as elements with similar behavior in the same column. It also shows four rectangular blocks with some approximately similar chemical properties. In general, within one row (period) the elements are metals on the left, and non-metals on the right.  

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What’s Lost as Handwriting Fades

Cursive writing is important in the learning process at Arma Dei Academy and it starts in kindergarten. By MARIA KONNIKOVA JUNE 2, 2014 New York Times Read more here  Does handwriting matter? Not very much, according to many educators. The Common Core standards, which have been adopted in most states, call for teaching legible writing, but only in kindergarten and first grade. After that, the emphasis quickly shifts to proficiency on the keyboard. But psychologists and neuroscientists say it is far too soon to declare handwriting a relic of the past. New evidence suggests that the links between handwriting and broader…

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History is HIS Story

by Mrs. Wenger, 5th Grade Teacher We gather together in celebration as the students of Arma Dei Academy bring life to history. As is typical in Classical Christian schools around the country, Arma Dei students are immersed in a chronological study of History. History is HIS Story  - how God has been at work through all times and civilizations. “His Story” is the organizing backbone whereupon our entire curriculum is built. Students develop an appreciation and understanding of the world around them by first studying the past. This fall, students in first grade, fifth grade, and the sixth grade have been…

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The First Thanksgiving

by Mrs. Cindy Holden, 1st Grade Teacher Early American history is formally introduced in the First grade. Our students presented a drama depicting events that may have occurred at the first Thanksgiving celebration. We begin our studies in the fall with Columbus convincing world leaders that the world was a sphere and that if one traveled west, eventually they could return to the site of the beginning of their journey. We focus on the desire of Columbus and Queen Isabella of Spain to spread the Gospel to the New World. Through this approach we present a Biblical Worldview of our American…

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Why should common core concern Christian parents?

The Common Core’s narrow, protected control of K–12 educational standards in the U.S. is unprecedented. For the past 100 years, progressive educators sought the holy grail of power in America—universal control of education. John Dewey, Charles Potter, and a host of other progressives made a play for universal educational control and standards in the early twentieth century. Charles Potter’s statement in the 1930s reveals this progressive intent: “What can theistic Sunday School, meeting for an hour once a week, do to stem the tide of a five-day program of humanistic teaching?” Lawrence Cremin, an historian at Columbia University, says it this…

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